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Old 01-19-2003, 12:54 AM   #1
bama4256
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Default Describe the City You Live In-Some Info

I live in Mobile, Alabama. Mobile was established in 1702. We celebrated our three hundredth year this past year. Mobile was discovered by the Spanish and later the French came in.

I have lived in Mobile since 1960 more or less.

Mobile contains a lot of civil war history and old antebellum homes.

About 25 miles south of Mobile is Dauphin Island on the Gulf of Mexico. Fort Gaines an old Confederate fort still exits, but is controlled by the Union now lol The fort is empty, it is a tourist attraction.

Also located in the Mobile area is Bellingrath Gardens-beautiful Azaleas and other plants. Really nice place to visit.

Mobile is a large port city and handles a lot of shipping. Fishing-freshwater and saltwater is very popular here. Brim or Crappie are the best freshwater fish to eat around here along with Catfish.

The Senior Bowl was played here today. It is played here every year and is considered the premiere bowl game for NFL scouts to look at players. Every NFL coach was here too. Saw Steve Spurrier this week.

Mobile is loaded with restaurants and bars. Some very nice bars or clubs and some very redneck.

We have very little racial problems here.

Mobile is a good place to raise your kids, but our school system which is the largest in Alabama is poor.

We have the University of South Alabama here. Luis Gonzalez played his college ball here and the famous coach and player Eddie Stanky once coached the Jaguars here. South Alabama has always been well known for its baseball program. Many por baseball players went to South Alabama.

We use to have a hockey team named the Mobile Mysticks, but it just didn't catch on with the people here and is now gone.

Mobile has a beautiful and unique looking Mobile Convention Center on Water St in downtown Mobile right on the river.

We have two tunnels-The George Wallace Tunnel and the old Bankhead tunnel.

We have the U.S.S. Alabama battleship and submarine Drum on display on the Causeway or Bay.

Mobile is a cool place. Mobile is also one of the rainest cities in the nation.
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Old 01-19-2003, 02:56 AM   #2
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I live in Warner Robins georgia. It's about 3/4 the size of Macon; which I think is the second largest city besides you know where!
WR is growing fast; and I have lived here all my day. My mom wants us to move to Augusta because that is where most of my family lives. Since my dad died back in july they wanted me to move up there. But my mom has handed me the decision if we do or not and I give her my decion on the 4th of may. And belive me right now; i just dont know. I love WR because all my freinds are here; and it is an awesome place to live because it is growing fast and one day it'll be huge but even though it's growing it's still got this small town attitude I like. We also have the largest wal mart in the south east( and unfortunately I have a mom who loves to shop=[ )

And thats my story.
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Old 01-19-2003, 03:02 AM   #3
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I live in the Bay Area, San Jose to be exact. It's about 40 miles south of SF/Oakland. I was here ever since I was about a year old, movin' here from Vietnam. I don't really know much history about this city, and I don't really think there is much anyway. All I know that this is a VERY boring place, expect no New York-style atmosphere here. Most schools right here are outdoors. Asians and Hispanics took over the place here, very little Black or White people. ALOT of Asians markets, one place almost look like China.
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Old 01-19-2003, 09:54 AM   #4
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I now call London, Ontario, Canada home. It's midway between Toronto and Detroit -- 1.5 hr drive either way -- in Southwestern Ontario. It houses 351,000 people and is named after London, England. The ties to the real London are obvious throughout the city, with Thames River running through the city, as well as many street names named after ones in the "real" London. There are 2 major postsecondary institutions in London: the University of Western Ontario is home to the Ivey School of Business which is routinely acknowledged as the #1 MBA school in Canada, and one of the top 3 or 4 in the world. Fanshawe college is another solid educationaly instutition. 25,000-30,000 graduates and undergraduates attend UWO yearly and the school will be 125 years old this upcomming spring. The school campus featuers many old London-style buildings which are really cool.

London is also known as "forest city" as there is a lot of green space, found all around UWO campus and the many parks in the city, including the most popular one, Victoria Park.

While we do not have any professional sports teams here, there was mild talk of a Candian Football League franchise being placed here after the city hosted a few CFL exhibition games, but with the small population, that will probably not happen. We do, however, have the London Knights of the CHL which are routinely competitive, as well as our university clubs. Our football team is always highly respectived, and so far this season, our hockey team is 14-0 in its attempt to go back-2-back for national championships.

Famous people to come from London are Steve Rucchin, who centers Paul Kariya's #1 scoring line on the NHL's Mighty Ducks of Anaheim; Boston Bruin's captain Joe Thornton; New York Rangers centers Eric Lindros; and acter Victor Gaber, who's most popular role was Thomas Andrews in James Cameron's 1997 version of Titanic, which picked up 11 1998 Academy Awards. (BTW, James Cameron is Canadian too )

That's about all I know about this city but that's pretty good considering I've only been here 4 months!
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Old 01-19-2003, 12:59 PM   #5
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My mother is from Georgia. Born and raised in Dublin. She also lived in Savannah.
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Old 01-19-2003, 01:09 PM   #6
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I live in Saguenay, Quebec.
Saguenay is a city formed by the fusion of Jonquiere, Chicoutimi and La Baie, as well as some minor towns. The city is home to about 154,000 people. I live in the part of the city called Jonquiere, itself formed by the fusion of Jonquiere, Arvida and Kenogami.

Home to two main and worldwide known industries -- Alcan Aluminum's main complexes are found in this region, including Arvida, Vaudreuil, Lapointe and Saguenay plants right here in Jonquiere; and Price Brothers paper mill (now Abitibi-Consolidated).

Specifically, I live in Arvida, formed in 1925 by Alcoa Aluminum Company. The site was chosen for the incredible hydroelectrical potential available with several powerful rivers. Large amounts of electricity are needed to make aluminum, and this electricity is provided by a group of dams, the most notable of which is the Shipshaw dam, constructed during WWII.
Some facts about this dam:
At the peak of construction, up to 10600 people worked onsite;
Food required:
4 and a half million eggs
1,750,000 pounds of meat
225 pounds of butter
37000 pounds of tea and coffee, among others.

Arvida is home to the former Manoir Du Saguenay, once a prestigious hotel having welcomed celebrities such as Robert Bourassa, Gilbert Bécaud, Maurice Chevalier, Charles Aznavour, Queen Elizabeth, Prinice Philip and many governors, ambassadors and other celebrities.

Other accomplishments include:
The construction of 270 houses in 135 days;
The aluminum bridge, one of the first constructed almost entirely of aluminum;
The aluminum sculpture, having traveled worldwide

The name 'Arvida' is a play on words with Alcoa president ARthur VIning DAvis's name.

In conclusion, this beautiful town, marked by its many old-fashioned buildings and tree-lined streets, is in one of the most beautiful regions of the world, where one of the only fjords outside of Norway is located, and has become the world aluminum capital.
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Old 01-19-2003, 02:03 PM   #7
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Well, Bozeman is a common college town. I've only been up here since September, so I only know so much. It's around 30,000 people, which about half are connect to the college in someway.

The town is not that big. However, expansion is huge now, and it's only a matter of time before it becomes a city. The downfall of that is that everything is so expensive up here.

I don't know much about the history. Apparently the town was founded by a french trapper by the name of Bozeman.

It's got tons of places to shop and do everything. Skiing and snowboarding is very popular, as is the Semi-Pro hockey team the IceDogs.

The nicest part is that its so clean up here, the air and ground. It's so serene and peaceful since it's located in the Rocky Mountains. Overall, I like it up here.
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Old 01-19-2003, 02:25 PM   #8
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Upper Arlington, OH is your average suburban city. It's about a stonethrow from OSU and downtown Columbus. The weather is generally crappy here especially in the winter, cold and grey. Theres not a whole lot to do here but we've got our Buckeyes and Blue Jackets.
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Old 01-19-2003, 06:07 PM   #9
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Atlanta, GA, heart of the dirty-ass South.

Atlanta's a bizarre metro area in the sense that such a small percentage of its population lives in the city itself. Atlanta proper has about 420,000 people, while the entire metropolitan area has ten times that. Even a metor area like Tokyo, where the suburbs go on forever, the city itself contains 25% of the population. Three types of people live in the city itself:

1. Young, single professionals (like me)
2. Very wealthy people
3. Very poor people

Parts of Hotlanta proper are pretty grungy, but all told, it's a pretty live town. I live in the Buckhead area, which has some tight clubs and awesome shopping. The Highlands area has some pleasant bars, too, while Hotlanta in general is known for great gentleman's establishments. All told, because of the clubs, gentleman's establishments, escorts, good-ol'-boy mentality, and sports, it's considered the ultimate guy city. The only problem is that the economy is reeling currently. The city absolutely boomed during the 1990s, and as the tech sector and the economy in general lost steam, Atlanta took a hit.

Still, nowhere else in the Deep South I'd even consider living in.
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Old 01-19-2003, 06:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by atllonghorn
Atlanta, GA, heart of the dirty-ass South.

I wished I lived there.
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Old 01-19-2003, 11:41 PM   #11
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Great idea for a thread, guys.

Atlanta is a nice city, atllonghorn. I have a lot of family there and was just there two summers ago -- a little north, actually, at a lake where my uncle has a house, boat, etc. (forget the name). Nice town because there's so much shopping and things to do.

I live in Long Valley, NJ. It's in northwestern New Jersey and has a population of about 35,000. It's 45 miles from New York City, and only an hour or two from both skiing and the beach, not to mention the aforementioned NYC, so that's very unique. Long Valley is situated in Morris County, which is statistically the wealthiest county in the United States -- I found that shocking since it isn't all castles or anything.

My area contains countless small townships like Long Valley that become more expensive and urbanized as you near NYC. Every 15 minutes, you'll pass through a new township. Surrounding ones for me are Mount Olive, Hackettstown, Chester, and Mendham. So while my town is small, it is near a lot of other towns, representing a huge surburban area surrounding NYC.

My area consists of mostly White middle class families, very few otherwise unless you get closer to the city. The schools are well-financed and most attend public schools compared to other cities where private schools are preferred. There aren't a lot of big universities around here except Rutgers.

There's a chance that my family could be moving again (eigth time in my 16-year life!) next year as my Dad got an offer to work for the SEC/government in Washington D.C. It's a two-year deal where the gov't "borrows" him and he returns to his current employer after the two years. So I don't know what the heck is happening, we'll see.
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Old 01-20-2003, 01:12 AM   #12
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Your city or town in Canada sounds very interesting. Marc I would like to visit around your area too. I've been to New York City and I was discharged from the military at McGuire AFB in New Jersey, but I've never really visited anywhere in your Garden state. Maybe one day soon I will. Do you like being so close to NYC and do you go there a lot?
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Old 01-20-2003, 01:40 AM   #13
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Well, In the 1940s, Miami became home for soldiers living in the city's military training camps. Always known for attracting a diverse blend of people, Miami also became the residence of the outlaw Al Capone. In the 1950s, the tourism industry grew. The white sandy beaches and warm climate provided the perfect setting for winter vacations. But Miami was still mainly a tourist playground, and had yet to reach its full potential as a metropolis.

Also, the mass Cuban immigration following Castro's 1959 revolution has been greatly responsible for Miami's growth since then as an area of international business and commerce. The first wave of political exiles included many educated professionals with a desire to apply their knowledge and skills to the city's growth. The Cuban community developed their own economic and social enclave, and fostered ties to the Latin American market. International business took Miami's downtown by storm as the city rapidly grew into more than just a tourist town.

Miami began to experience problems in its transitional growth. Crime rose tremendously in the 1980s. Race relations grew tense, riots broke out, and the historic Art Deco district in South Beach was left to deteriorate. But crime is now down and restoration projects abound thankfully.

Miami has come a long way since the days of Julia Tuttle and Henry Flagler. As the gateway to Latin America, Miami serves as the headquarters for many international companies and as home to the leading Spanish-language media in the United States. South Beach has become one of the country's hottest hubs of style, fashion, and nightlife. The ethnically diverse city continues to attract a multitude of cultures.

I live 20 minutes west of Downtown Miami in a suburb known as Westchester. Middle class latin's generally rule this part of Miami as there are an abundance of Latin Cafe's, Shops and Supermarkets. Florida International University is almost at walking distance and there are plenty of Middle and Elementary schools in the surrounding area. I've also had sort of a gypsy like living moving from Miami to Orlando, back to Miami, to New York City, back to Miami, to Detroit and back to Miami. I'm glad I'm back home. There is plenty of sunshine, beaches, and best of all ... women

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Old 01-20-2003, 10:10 AM   #14
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Keith, you talking to Sam or me???


Now, for my home town of GIlbert Plains, Manitoba....

Gilbert Plains was upgraded from "villiage" to "town" status on January 1, 2000. The town consists of 1,000 people in about a 1 mile-by-1 mile block with a rural municipality extending around the town in about a 15 mile radius. The high school has about 80 students in it (Grades 9 thru 12) while the Elementray School has about 150-200 students in it. Despite the small numbers, our boy's volleyball team has finished 2nd in the province in volleyball in each of the past two years, and our male and female hockey teams are very competitivey provincially as well.

Our town's economy is bascially centered around farming. My dad and his brothers run a grain farm that harvests about 2,500 acres. We also have a hog barn operation consisting of 4,000 pigs. To some that seems like a large amount, but our hog barn is only a small one and our farm is only an average size.

Despite near-drought conditions in Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba over the last 8-10 months, our little section of Southwestern Manitoba has had very good farming conditions over the past few years.

It does get very cold in the winter -- -40 or -45 Celsius (-40 to -56 Fahrenheit) with the windchill factor... but in the summer it gets to +40 or +45 Celsius (104-113 Farenheit) with the humidex factor, which is definitley one of the widest spreads in temperature any region encounters... in the cold, it's always cold... in the south, it's always hot... on the prarie, you get BOTH of the extremes.

We have one of hte Top 5 golf courses in the province right in our home town. Because of farming becoming more and more large-scale, the younger population is moving away to urban centers but the old people move in and stay to golf, :lol:

And that's my town :nod:
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Old 01-20-2003, 12:02 PM   #15
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london == boring
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