Go Back   Sports Central Message Boards > Community Discussion > The Lounge

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-27-2007, 02:44 PM   #1
CKFresh
Most Hated Member
 
CKFresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 7,377
CKFresh will become famous soon enough
Default What are you Reading?

I just finished two great books and wanted to start a thread about books.

God Bless you Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut. Great book, especially for those who love social commentary.

Post Office by Charles Bukowski. Another good boook. Very interesting in terms of sexual encounters and life as a postal worker. I highly recommend it. :thumbup:

What are you reading?
__________________
Do yourself a favor, become your own savior.

Think Fresh.
CKFresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2007, 02:54 PM   #2
Marino13
Professional Muff Diver
 
Marino13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 182
Marino13 is on a distinguished road
Default



It's really helping me deal with my crack addiction. Great pictures too!
__________________
Fat chicks swallow because they're hungry.
Marino13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2007, 03:04 PM   #3
CKFresh
Most Hated Member
 
CKFresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 7,377
CKFresh will become famous soon enough
Default

LOL.

"The Bears" helped me through many of my problems in life as well. Good luck with that Marino!
__________________
Do yourself a favor, become your own savior.

Think Fresh.
CKFresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2007, 03:18 PM   #4
tobynosker
Sports Virtuoso
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 3,309
tobynosker is on a distinguished road
Default

Currently, I am reading Michael J. Fox's autobiography "Lucky Man" for the second time.

Next, I plan to read Mike Vaccaro's "Emporers and Idiots: The One Hundred Year Rivalry Between the Yankees and the Red Sox, From the Very Beginning to the End of the Curse." I started reading it about a year-and-a half ago, but stopped midway through and never returned to it. But the start of the baseball season has gotten me in the mood to give it another try.
tobynosker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2007, 05:09 PM   #5
grizzle_810
All-Star Player
 
grizzle_810's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 322
grizzle_810 is on a distinguished road
Default

in the past couple years, i went political/consevrative:

Liberalism is a mental disorder (Michael Savage)
The Political Zoo (savage)
Who's Looking out for You? (bill o'reilly)
running the world (a book about national security council and intell)

my latest kick was financial/entreprenuerial (sp?) books:

Think and Grow Rich (pretty good)
Rich Dad, Poor Dad (excellent)
The Millionaire Next Door (starts to get redundant, but wonderful stats)

Currently:

How to Win Friends and Influence People (written about 80 years ago, absolutely wonderful this far and amazing how timeless it is)

I highly recommend How to win friends to anyone. The title may scare people off because it suggests you need help getting friends. The book is thus far much more about life perspective and attitude. It's very straight forward, and most of the stuff is obvious, but to have someone say it to remind you is nice. Simple things it suggests like smiling and asking for someone else's comment before giving yours will immediately impact your daily life. I really dig this book.
__________________
www.gamedaythreads.com
grizzle_810 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2007, 05:21 PM   #6
CKFresh
Most Hated Member
 
CKFresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 7,377
CKFresh will become famous soon enough
Default

Quote:
Liberalism is a mental disorder (Michael Savage)
Perhaps Savage would rather us live without any liberals... You know what that society would look like? Afgahnistan. They are VERY conservative. They hate liberalism.

Let me explain some liberal ideas, you tell me if they fall under the "mental disorder" description:

Equality for Women
Equality for Minorities
Democracy
Individual liberty
Market Economy
Habeus corpes
Tolerance

Yeah, sounds pretty insane to me....

Liberalism is not a mental disorder, conservativism is not either. We need both philosophies in this country, that is what makes us so great.

The US is great because we are not too conservative (Afgahnistan) and not too liberal (Europe). Without liberals this country would turn to ****. Without conservatives this country would turn into Europe.
__________________
Do yourself a favor, become your own savior.

Think Fresh.
CKFresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2007, 08:01 PM   #7
Montrovant
Hatecarver
 
Montrovant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tampa
Posts: 685
Montrovant is on a distinguished road
Default

Calm down CK, I thought this was about books, not politics!

So other than Marino's Bears book (lol!) do we just have a bunch of non-fiction readers here?

I'm currently reading The Shadow of Saganami by David Weber for the second time, as well as Watch on the Rhine from John Ringo. I have a series by Raymond Feist waiting for me when I get around to them.

Non-fiction reading is for work/school, fiction is for fun! :thumbup:
Montrovant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2007, 11:40 AM   #8
bama4256
Baseball Fanatic
 
bama4256's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Marshalltown, Iowa
Posts: 6,484
bama4256 will become famous soon enough
Default

Right now I'm reading "Crusader Nation"-(The US in Peace and the Great War 1898-1920) Great history book. Written by David Traxel.
__________________
Keith "baseball nut" Thronson
bama4256 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2007, 03:10 PM   #9
CKFresh
Most Hated Member
 
CKFresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 7,377
CKFresh will become famous soon enough
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montrovant View Post
Calm down CK, I thought this was about books, not politics!

So other than Marino's Bears book (lol!) do we just have a bunch of non-fiction readers here?

I'm currently reading The Shadow of Saganami by David Weber for the second time, as well as Watch on the Rhine from John Ringo. I have a series by Raymond Feist waiting for me when I get around to them.

Non-fiction reading is for work/school, fiction is for fun! :thumbup:
Sorry Montro,

When I see the words "Liberalism is a mental disorder" I get a little angy...

Anyway,

I read fiction. I love Vonnegut and have recently got into Charles Bukowski.

I am looking for a new book to start reading, any suggestions?
__________________
Do yourself a favor, become your own savior.

Think Fresh.
CKFresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2007, 08:45 PM   #10
grizzle_810
All-Star Player
 
grizzle_810's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 322
grizzle_810 is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CKFresh View Post
Perhaps Savage would rather us live without any liberals... You know what that society would look like? Afgahnistan. They are VERY conservative. They hate liberalism.

Let me explain some liberal ideas, you tell me if they fall under the "mental disorder" description:

Equality for Women
Equality for Minorities
Democracy
Individual liberty
Market Economy
Habeus corpes
Tolerance

Yeah, sounds pretty insane to me....

Liberalism is not a mental disorder, conservativism is not either. We need both philosophies in this country, that is what makes us so great.

The US is great because we are not too conservative (Afgahnistan) and not too liberal (Europe). Without liberals this country would turn to ****. Without conservatives this country would turn into Europe.
First of all, I told you I read the book, I said nothing of my views about it or liberalism in general. I see what you were going for, but I think you got a little personal too quick. I hope I could read Mein Kampf (sp) without you wondering if I were a Nazi. my point is, you didn't ask what i thought of the book, you noticed i had read the book and assumed i was a blind savage follower. perhaps my review of it was "man! savage is way off base with that!" i will let it slide because i also had some other conservative titles on there, so you probably went circumstantial evidence with your approach. either way, no biggie.

Second, what savage refers to in his title as "liberalism" differs vastly from your own representation. I am not only referring to your one post, I have read a vast amount of what you have written on here. Savage essentially creates his own definition for "liberalism", and makes an indictment of THAT, not liberal ideas in general. In fact, on his radio show, he often asks where the "true liberals" have gone, and cites them as being a necessary force in our nation. he often looks back fondly on noted "liberals" of history. in summary, this book first lays out what HE feels liberalism has been twisted into by the far left (m. moore, cindy sheehan, etc), and states why THOSE ideals are a "mental disorder". now, all that sugar coating being said, make no mistake that savage is a pretty hard core conservative. but either way, he clearly describes that liberal IDEAS are often compassionate, good, and just. however, he disagrees with the MANIPULATION and APPLICATION of those ideas by far left people. and i share that opinion. all those things you cited up there are great for our country and humanity, it's the attempt to achieve those goals where we often fail.
__________________
www.gamedaythreads.com
grizzle_810 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2007, 11:09 AM   #11
CKFresh
Most Hated Member
 
CKFresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 7,377
CKFresh will become famous soon enough
Default

grizzle,

I'm sorry if my tone was interpreted as attacking you, but I meant to attack Savage.

I think that type of rhetoric, from either side, is counter productive. To say that any ideology is a mental disorder is just silly, and it works to divide our nation. We live in a country where war heros are made out to be disgraceful (John Kerry) simply because of politics. People who serve in wars shouldn't be put to shame simply because of their ideology, and that's where we've come as a nation. Everyone is more worried about their "team" (political party) than they are worried about our country. I think people like Savage would rather see his party succeed than see his country succeed.

When you have people saying, "if you elect democrats, expect another attack," we have gone too far. I feel the same about people on my side who say that Bush is a war criminal.

We need to get back to the point when we value nation over party. Michael Savage and people like him do not help our country. Divisive politics only serve to make us weaker.

If you would like to read something that will give you hope for a better tomorrow, instead something that creates hate try this one:

Democracy Matters by Cornel West.

http://www.amazon.com/Democracy-Matt.../dp/1594200297
__________________
Do yourself a favor, become your own savior.

Think Fresh.
CKFresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2007, 05:46 PM   #12
grizzle_810
All-Star Player
 
grizzle_810's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 322
grizzle_810 is on a distinguished road
Default

No, you're fine. I just wanted to make sure I was clear that me reading a book does not a disciple of the author make. Like I said, I have read a lot of your posts, I know you are smart enough to make the distinction, I was simply putting the idea in your head.

You are right and wrong about Savage. You are wrong in that he does NOT in any way endorse the Republicans. Sure, he is conservative, but his whole "schtick" is to say that he is an independant conservative. He is not in any way a blaring horn for the GOP, that's what Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity do. Those guys have closed minds. I enjoy Savage because he is original, "fresh" and he will take repub's to task when he feels they screw up. One small example, he loathes Bush and often says it. Savage always cites borders, language and culture. He stays in the cultural and societal realms much more than politics. Bottom line, I agree with your point about party loyalty being counter-productive, but i think that attack falls squarely on guys like hannity and limbaugh, much more than savage.

Where you were RIGHT about savage is that he is divisive. Extremely. As i mentioned above, I don't believe he does this with party affiliation, but moreso with the "personal" way he attacks his opposition (such as saying they have "mental disorders" as you said). Savage dreams of a ruffneck conservative america, which would probably resemble the thick of WWII time in our country. It just won't happen. In the end, we can easily recognize that naming his book as such was likely a shameless ploy to sell more copies. calling it "liberalism: a wonderful idea with faulty implementation" wouldn't raise eyebrows, ya know?
__________________
www.gamedaythreads.com
grizzle_810 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2007, 06:06 PM   #13
CKFresh
Most Hated Member
 
CKFresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 7,377
CKFresh will become famous soon enough
Default

I hear ya.

Savage is one political personality that I know very little about. So I guess my accusations are fairly ignorant. I am basically basing it off hear-say and the title of the book. You are absolutely correct about Limbaugh and Hannity, whereas on the left you have Olberman and Frankin.

You are probably right about his motivation for the title (to sell books) but I still view it as irresponsible, simply because there are many people that will believe anything he says. Even if he doesn't truly belive the title of his book to be true, I still find it irresonsible.

Keep in mind, I find many of the statements that Michael Moore and other liberals say very irresponsible.

I probably do have a inaccurate view of Savage, since I know very little about him.

I appreciate your calm and respectful tone. That is refreshing and rare on this site.

You should check out that book I mentioned. Written by a "mental disorder liberal," but it is very good, for all ideologies.
__________________
Do yourself a favor, become your own savior.

Think Fresh.
CKFresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2007, 05:59 PM   #14
bama4256
Baseball Fanatic
 
bama4256's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Marshalltown, Iowa
Posts: 6,484
bama4256 will become famous soon enough
Default

I'm reading a book now about the whaleship Essex!
__________________
Keith "baseball nut" Thronson
bama4256 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2007, 03:32 PM   #15
CKFresh
Most Hated Member
 
CKFresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 7,377
CKFresh will become famous soon enough
Default

God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens

From Publishers Weekly
Hitchens, one of our great political pugilists, delivers the best of the recent rash of atheist manifestos. The same contrarian spirit that makes him delightful reading as a political commentator, even (or especially) when he's completely wrong, makes him an entertaining huckster prosecutor once he has God placed in the dock. And can he turn a phrase!: "monotheistic religion is a plagiarism of a plagiarism of a hearsay of a hearsay, of an illusion of an illusion, extending all the way back to a fabrication of a few nonevents." Hitchens's one-liners bear the marks of considerable sparring practice with believers. Yet few believers will recognize themselves as Hitchens associates all of them for all time with the worst of history's theocratic and inquisitional moments. All the same, this is salutary reading as a means of culling believers' weaker arguments: that faith offers comfort (false comfort is none at all), or has provided a historical hedge against fascism (it mostly hasn't), or that "Eastern" religions are better (nope). The book's real strength is Hitchens's on-the-ground glimpses of religion's worst face in various war zones and isolated despotic regimes. But its weakness is its almost fanatical insistence that religion poisons "everything," which tips over into barely disguised misanthropy. (May 30)
Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From The Washington Post's Book World/washingtonpost.com
Reviewed by Stephen Prothero
A century and a half ago Pope Pius IX published the Syllabus of Errors, a rhetorical tour de force against the high crimes and misdemeanors of the modern world. God Is Not Great, by the British journalist and professional provocateur Christopher Hitchens, is the atheists' equivalent: an unrelenting enumeration of religion's sins and wickedness, written with much of the rhetorical pomp and all of the imperial condescension of a Vatican encyclical.

Hitchens, who once described Mother Teresa as "a fanatic, a fundamentalist, and a fraud," is notorious for making mincemeat out of sacred cows, but in this book it is the sacred itself that is skewered. Religion, Hitchens writes, is "violent, irrational, intolerant, allied to racism and tribalism and bigotry, invested in ignorance and hostile to free inquiry, contemptuous of women and coercive toward children." Channeling the anti-supernatural spirits of other acolytes of the "new atheism," Hitchens argues that religion is "man-made" and murderous, originating in fear and sustained by brute force. Like Richard Dawkins, he denounces the religious education of young people as child abuse. Like Sam Harris, he fires away at the Koran as well as the Bible. And like Daniel Dennett, he views faith as wish-fulfillment.

Historian George Marsden once described fundamentalism as evangelicalism that is mad about something. If so, these evangelistic atheists have something in common with their fundamentalist foes, and Hitchens is the maddest of the lot. Protestant theologian John Calvin was "a sadist and torturer and killer," Hitchens writes, and the Bible "contain[s] a warrant for trafficking in humans, for ethnic cleansing, for slavery, for bride-price, and for indiscriminate massacre."

As should be obvious to any reasonable person -- unlike Hitchens I do not exclude believers from this category -- horrors and good deeds are performed by believers and non-believers alike. But in Hitchens's Manichaean world, religion does little good and secularism hardly any evil. Indeed, Hitchens arrives at the conclusion that the secular murderousness of Stalin's purges wasn't really secular at all, since, as he quotes George Orwell, "a totalitarian state is in effect a theocracy." And in North Korea today, what has gone awry is not communism but Confucianism.

Hitchens is not so forgiving when it comes to religion's transgressions. He aims his poison pen at the Dalai Lama, St. Francis and Gandhi. Among religious leaders only the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. comes off well. But in the gospel according to Hitchens whatever good King did accrues to his humanism rather than his Christianity. In fact, King was not actually a Christian at all, argues Hitchens, since he rejected the sadism that characterizes the teachings of Jesus. "No supernatural force was required to make the case against racism" in postwar America, writes Hitchens. But he's wrong. It was the prophetic faith of black believers that gave them the strength to stand up to the indignities of fire hoses and police dogs. As for those white liberals inspired by Paine, Mencken and Hitchens's other secular heroes, well, they stood down.

Hitchens says a lot of true things in this wrongheaded book. He is right that you can be moral without being religious. He is right to track contemporary sexism and sexual repression to ancient religious beliefs. And his attack on "intelligent design" is not only convincing but comical, coursing as it does through the crude architecture of the appendix and our inconvenient "urinogenital arrangements."

What Hitchens gets wrong is religion itself.

Hitchens claims that some of his best friends are believers. If so, he doesn't know much about his best friends. He writes about religious people the way northern racists used to talk about "Negroes" -- with feigned knowing and a sneer. God Is Not Great assumes a childish definition of religion and then criticizes religious people for believing such foolery. But it is Hitchens who is the naf. To read this oddly innocent book as gospel is to believe that ordinary Catholics are proud of the Inquisition, that ordinary Hindus view masturbation as an offense against Krishna, and that ordinary Jews cheer when a renegade Orthodox rebbe sucks the blood off a freshly circumcised *****. It is to believe that faith is always blind and rituals always empty -- that there is no difference between taking communion and drinking the Kool-Aid (a beverage Hitchens feels compelled to mention no fewer than three times).

If this is religion, then by all means we should have less of it. But the only people who believe that religion is about believing blindly in a God who blesses and curses on demand and sees science and reason as spawns of Satan are unlettered fundamentalists and their atheistic doppelgangers. Hitchens describes the religious mind as "literal and limited" and the atheistic mind as "ironic and inquiring." Readers with any sense of irony -- and here I do not exclude believers -- will be surprised to see how little inquiring Hitchens has done and how limited and literal is his own ill-prepared reduction of religion.

Christopher Hitchens is a brilliant man, and there is no living journalist I more enjoy reading. But I have never encountered a book whose author is so fundamentally unacquainted with its subject. In the end, this maddeningly dogmatic book does little more than illustrate one of Hitchens's pet themes -- the ability of dogma to put reason to sleep.

Copyright 2007, The Washington Post. All Rights Reserved.
__________________
Do yourself a favor, become your own savior.

Think Fresh.
CKFresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Democrats and Iraq LA sports Politics & Religion 295 12-20-2006 09:19 PM
What are you reading? HibachiDG The Lounge 27 10-24-2006 06:33 PM
What are you reading? jhuerbin88 The Lounge 25 02-27-2005 01:33 AM
'I'm just reading the articles, honey' Marc The Lounge 20 02-25-2003 11:43 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:31 PM.